Marina Niks

Accountability in Adult Literacy: Voices from the field (2008)

To understand and describe the state of a field, researchers traditionally carry out a literature review. This approach is widely accepted as a way to summarize what is known in the field. With Connecting the Dots: Improving Accountability in the Adult Literacy Field in Canada the authors knew they needed to do that. But more was needed.

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2009-07-07

2005 National Summer Institute (2005)

Working Together on Literacy and Health Research - Final Report

This is the Final Report for a National Summer Institute held in Vancouver, BC in July 2005 regarding Literacy and Health Research. Included are key strategic directions for future research around literacy and health issues.

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2006-08-15

Developing a Framework for Research in Practice in Adult Literacy in Canada (2004)

Research in practice promotes improvements in practice, informs policy, and contributes to learner success in the adult literacy field. Research in practice in adult literacy has been gaining strength and visibility; however, there is an unevenness of support and capacity across the country. There is a need for a strategic framework that will address this disparity and guide future practice and policy.

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2004-11-17

The More We Get Together: The Politics of Collaborative Research Between University-based and Non University-based Researchers (2004)

This thesis was submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the Faculty of Graduate Studies (Department of Educational Studies), University of British Columbia. The author explores the experiences and understandings of university-based and non university-based researchers about their collaborative work.

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2004-01-01

Dancing in the Dark (2003)

How do Adults with Little Formal Education Learn? How do Literacy Practitioners do Collaborative Research?

This is a report of a research project intended to answer two questions, 1) How do adults with little formal education learn?, and; 2) How do literacy practitioners do collaborative research? To both, there is a set of intricate steps that involve others: dancing. In both, there is a lack of formal training, education or certification to permit the dancers to do what they are doing: dark…thus, the title, “Dancing in the Dark”.

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2003-12-17
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