Skip to content

Browse by series "Research in Practice in Adult Literacy (RiPAL) Network"

Displaying Results 1 to 4 of 4

Sort by

1. Adapting 'Writing to Read' for Adult Literacy Students (2002)

Adapting 'Writing to Read' for Adult Literacy Students

It worked for Bill. Will it work for Carol?

Series: Research in Practice in Adult Literacy (RiPAL) Network

Authors: Fay Holt Begg

Collection: Research Materials

This document is one in a series prepared by literacy practitioner/researchers in Alberta to investigate a range of questions. Here, the author looks at whether it is possible to adapt the Writing to Read method, which teaches children to write as a precursor to reading, for use with adult literacy students.

The author had already worked with one adult for whom the method proved very successful, so she decides to use it with another adult learner. This time, the outcome is very different, underscoring the importance of tailoring tutoring to the needs of the individual learner.

In particular, the experience emphasizes the need to assess the learner before planning a course of study and the importance of mutual trust between tutor and learner.

Funders:

Added: 2003-04-04

View complete record details...

2. Exploring tutors' and students' beliefs about reading and reading strategies. (2002)

Exploring tutors' and students' beliefs about reading and reading strategies.

Series: Research in Practice in Adult Literacy (RiPAL) Network

Authors: Rebecca Still

Collection: Research Materials

This document is part of a series prepared by literacy practitioner/researchers in Alberta to explore questions relating to literacy.

The author is a coordinator for a rural community-based volunteer tutor adult literacy program that involves about 40 students and 20 tutors a year. The study involved semi-structured interviews with three students and three tutors, along with observations of students as they were reading.

The interviews show that all three tutor-student pairs had similar views about reading and the reading process, agreeing that a good reader practises and reads a lot. Tutors’ responses supported a balanced approach that encourages reading for meaning, as well as using relevant reading material to teach print-based skills.

Funders:

Added: 2003-04-04

View complete record details...

3. 'Rapid writing...is my cup of tea'. Adult upgrading students' use of writing strategies. (2002)

'Rapid writing...is my cup of tea'. Adult upgrading students' use of writing strategies.

Series: Research in Practice in Adult Literacy (RiPAL) Network

Authors: Pamela Young

Collection: Research Materials

This study is part of a series, prepared by literacy practitioner/researchers in Alberta, that investigates questions relating to literacy.

The author, who teaches an English learning strategies course in an urban college, analyzes the classroom journals of six students to determine what writing strategies they use and whether these strategies help them to succeed in their writing assignments.

The analysis showed that the students used strategies they had learned in class to generate ideas, organize information, and write drafts. For instance, five of the six students used a technique called rapid writing, which involves writing non-stop about a topic for a given time, not pausing to edit for appropriateness or mechanical correctness.

The author concludes that taking the time to teach, model and practise writing strategies with adult upgrading students has many positive outcomes.

Funders:

Added: 2003-04-04

View complete record details...

4. What do adult literacy students think being literate is? (2002)

What do adult literacy students think being literate is?

Series: Research in Practice in Adult Literacy (RiPAL) Network

Authors: Andrea Pheasey

Collection: Research Materials

This document is part of a series prepared by literacy practitioner/researchers in Alberta to look at a variety of questions related to literacy.

The author, a facilitator in a community-based adult literacy program, interviewed a small group of adult learners to explore their motives for joining the program and to see how they defined literacy.

For these adult learners, being literate means speaking, reading, listening, writing and understanding language. As well, literacy means having the knowledge needed to get along in the world.

The author notes that the learners’ inclusion of oral language skills in the definition of literacy points to the need for more emphasis on voice and speech in literacy programs.

Added: 2003-04-04

View complete record details...

Displaying Results 1 to 4 of 4

Sort by
© Copian