Does placement matter? Comparing the academic performance of students with special needs in inclusive and separate settings (2009)

Lessons in Learning – March 18, 2009

There is ongoing debate about whether students with special needs are better served in inclusive classrooms or in separate settings with peers who share similar challenges. The authors of this discussion paper have reviewed 30 studies that compare inclusive and separate learning settings for students with learning disabilities, intellectual disabilities, language impairments, and mixed disabilities. The studies were carried out in the United States, the United Kingdom and Canada.

They conclude that all else being equal, inclusive settings appear not to academically disadvantage most students with special educational needs and, in many cases, appear to offer an advantage over separate settings.

However, these results are not homogenous and effects are generally small in magnitude, suggesting that while inclusive settings are generally preferable, factors other than classroom setting are probably more important determinants of academic success.

The authors point to the importance of teacher capacity building; the need for thoughtful implementation of inclusion; and the necessity of establishing realistic class sizes and ratios of students with special needs.

Get resource
Added: 
2012-03-12
APA citation
Canadian Council on Learning (CCL). Does placement matter? Comparing the academic performance of students with special needs in inclusive and separate settings 2009. Web. 26 Sep. 2020 <http://en.copian.ca/library/research/ccl/lessons_learning/does_placement_matter/does_placement_matter.pdf>
Canadian Council on Learning (CCL) (2009). Does placement matter? Comparing the academic performance of students with special needs in inclusive and separate settings. Retrieved September 26, 2020, from http://en.copian.ca/library/research/ccl/lessons_learning/does_placement_matter/does_placement_matter.pdf
© 2020 Copian Library