Adult learning in Canada: Characteristics of learners (2008)

Education Matters: Insights on Education, Learning and Training in Canada, April 2008, Vol. 5, No. 1

This article, published by Statistics Canada, provides an analysis of some findings from the 2003 International Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (IALLS).

The results indicate that those with the highest levels of literacy participate in adult learning at much higher rates than those at the lowest levels of literacy. The implication is that those most in need of learning to enhance their skills to compete in the labour market are least likely to participate in education and training opportunities.

Family background also plays a key role in participation in adult learning. People who grew up in families where literacy is valued tend to think positively about adult education.

The author notes that financial support from employers plays a central role in supporting opportunities for adult education and training. However, participation in employer-sponsored training is not equal across groups of workers, and workers with the least education are also least likely to participate in training.

Get resource
Publishers: 
Added: 
2012-04-18
APA citation
Kathryn McMullen. Adult learning in Canada: Characteristics of learners 2008. Web. 26 Nov. 2020 <http://en.copian.ca/library/research/stats/adult_learn_canada/adult_learn_canada.pdf>
Kathryn McMullen (2008). Adult learning in Canada: Characteristics of learners. Retrieved November 26, 2020, from http://en.copian.ca/library/research/stats/adult_learn_canada/adult_learn_canada.pdf
© 2020 Copian Library