No “drop” in the bucket: the high costs of dropping out (2009)

Lessons in Learning – February 4, 2009

Despite recent declines in high school dropout rates, thousands of young Canadians still leave high school every year without a diploma.

The authors point out that dropping out of high school carries many costs, both tangible and intangible. The tangible costs include increased public expenditures in health, social services and other programs; higher rates of criminal activity; and lower economic productivity. Intangible costs include diminished social growth; a reduced sense of control over life circumstances; and less personal satisfaction.

They offer examples of strategies being used in Canada’s provinces and territories to keep students engaged in their studies until they complete their high school diplomas. These include programs that offer real-life work experience; reach out to teen parents and working students; or encourage parents, teachers and students to work together to motivate young people to stay in school.

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Added: 
2012-04-30
APA citation
Canadian Council on Learning (CCL). No “drop” in the bucket: the high costs of dropping out 2009. Web. 5 Dec. 2020 <http://en.copian.ca/library/research/ccl/lessons_learning/no_drop_bucket/no_drop_bucket.pdf>
Canadian Council on Learning (CCL) (2009). No “drop” in the bucket: the high costs of dropping out. Retrieved December 5, 2020, from http://en.copian.ca/library/research/ccl/lessons_learning/no_drop_bucket/no_drop_bucket.pdf
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