The Longitudinal Study of Adult Learning: Challenging Assumptions (2012)

Research Brief

This document offers a brief account of a study, carried out between 1998 and 2007, of 1,000 high school dropouts in the Portland, Oregon, area of the United States.

One of the study’s key findings is that literacy continues to develop in adult life after leaving school. Literacy development varies, with some adults’ proficiencies increasing over time, some decreasing, and others remaining relatively constant. The changes depend on demographic and background characteristics and on specific life events and experiences.

The author, a professor at Portland State University, points to a number of policy implications that arise from the study, including the need for a broader concept of literacy programs; the importance of using multiple measures for continuous improvement efforts; and the need for strong learner support systems.

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2012-07-10
APA citation
Steve Reder. The Longitudinal Study of Adult Learning: Challenging Assumptions 2012. Web. 13 Aug. 2020 <http://en.copian.ca/library/research/cfl/longitudinal_study/longitudinal_study.pdf>
Steve Reder (2012). The Longitudinal Study of Adult Learning: Challenging Assumptions. Retrieved August 13, 2020, from http://en.copian.ca/library/research/cfl/longitudinal_study/longitudinal_study.pdf
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