Gender differences in career choices: Why girls don't like science (2007)

Lessons in Learning - November 1, 2007

While growing numbers of Canadian women are successfully pursuing postsecondary studies, there is still a large gender gap in science-related occupations and a gender-based wage gap.

Research suggests that there is no gender difference between girls and boys when in comes to ability and aptitude for science, the authors note. These findings suggest that cultural or environmental factors, rather than biological ones, affect girls’ interests and career choices.

Parents may inadvertently influence girls’ lack of interest in science by responding differently to sons and daughters. They may be more likely to explain scientific concepts to sons than to daughters, or may be more inclined to buy science materials like chemistry sets or microscopes for boys rather than girls.

The authors offer a number of suggestions for parents, including encouraging daughters to take science courses in high school; providing opportunities for girls to meet women scientists; and watching science-related television programs with their children.

They also describe a number of programs designed to encourage interest in the sciences. Some are open to both girls and boys, while others are specifically for girls.

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2013-01-03
APA citation
Canadian Council on Learning (CCL). Gender differences in career choices: Why girls don't like science 2007. Web. 30 Nov. 2020 <http://en.copian.ca/library/research/ccl/lessons_learning/gender_differences_career/gender_differences_career.pdf>
Canadian Council on Learning (CCL) (2007). Gender differences in career choices: Why girls don't like science. Retrieved November 30, 2020, from http://en.copian.ca/library/research/ccl/lessons_learning/gender_differences_career/gender_differences_career.pdf
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