Literature Review - State of Practice: Essential Skills Applications with First Nations, Inuit and Métis in Canada (2012)

The purpose of this literature review is to describe the current need for Essential Skills (ES) development among First Nations, Inuit and Métis people; to look at the state of practice of Essential Skills initiatives with these populations in Canada; and to examine innovative practices to determine potential “markers of excellence” in ES programming. The review is based on online resources, as well as email and telephone research.

The first section of the paper deals with current and historic barriers to Aboriginal barriers to education and employment, and with the convergence between the development of the Essential Skills approach and the growth of self-determination in Aboriginal education.

The author identifies 12 markers that promote success in ES program development and delivery. They include Aboriginal control and ownership of education and training initiatives; strategic partnerships; community involvement; a learner-centred approach; experienced and knowledgeable staff; a holistic approach; adherence to principles of both adult and indigenous learning ; the placement of learning within Aboriginal culture, language, and tradition; and ongoing communication about initiatives.

As well, the author points to the importance of employer involvement and direct workplace experience; establishing evaluation criteria and methods; and promoting the business case for ES initiatives.

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2013-02-21
APA citation
Suzanne Klinga. Literature Review - State of Practice: Essential Skills Applications with First Nations, Inuit and Métis in Canada 2012. Web. 5 Oct. 2022 <http://en.copian.ca/library/research/literature_review/literature_review.pdf>
Suzanne Klinga (2012). Literature Review - State of Practice: Essential Skills Applications with First Nations, Inuit and Métis in Canada. Retrieved October 5, 2022, from http://en.copian.ca/library/research/literature_review/literature_review.pdf
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