The Lieutenant Governor's Aboriginal Summer Reading Camps - 2012 Report (2012)

Since 2005, the Lieutenant Governor’s Aboriginal Summer Reading Camps have been offered in remote First Nation communities in northern Ontario to help children retain and build their literacy skills over the long school vacation. This report outlines the highlights of the 2012 camps.

In previous years, Frontier College managed camp programming while the Office of the Lieutenant Governor managed fundraising. As of 2012, Frontier College has assumed responsibility for fundraising too. The organization is also working to build better coordination and support for some of the other programs delivered in the territory of the Nishnawbe Aski Nation, an organization that represents 49 First Nation communities in northern Ontario.

In 2012, a total of 2,438 children in camps held in 28 remote communities. About 600 community members, elders, and parents visited the camps. Almost 1,700 books were distributed free of charge to children attending the camps.

In follow-up evaluations, 96 percent of educators reported positive impacts on learning among children who had attended the camps.

Frontier College is a national literacy organization that forms partnerships to provide learning opportunities for Canadians of all ages.

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Added: 
2013-03-08
APA citation
Frontier College. The Lieutenant Governor's Aboriginal Summer Reading Camps - 2012 Report 2012. Web. 27 Nov. 2021 <http://en.copian.ca/library/research/frontier/lg_reading_camps_2012_report/lg_reading_camps_2012_report.pdf>
Frontier College (2012). The Lieutenant Governor's Aboriginal Summer Reading Camps - 2012 Report. Retrieved November 27, 2021, from http://en.copian.ca/library/research/frontier/lg_reading_camps_2012_report/lg_reading_camps_2012_report.pdf
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