Do students entering university have the basic writing and math skills they need? (2005)

Lessons in Learning – October 28, 2005

While recent testing suggests that Canadian students’ comprehension of basic skills is generally not declining, proficiency exams administered within some universities do show very slight declines in the skills of incoming students. Even though this decline is small overall, the authors of this paper say it does offer lessons in learning for students, their families, professors, universities, and governments.

The transition from high school to university provokes anxiety for many students, who worry whether they can handle the increased independence. Families can help by encouraging students to make use of available support services.

Universities can help by providing social and academic support services that offer the most effective help for students. The authors suggest that professors and administrators look at the examples offered by universities where students consistently express satisfaction with the level of support.

The authors also encourage governments to recognize that pursuing policies designed for the sole purpose of increasing the number of students in first-year university courses can have unintended consequences, including the need to offer costly support services for students who are perceived to lack required skills.

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2013-05-14
APA citation
Canadian Council on Learning (CCL). Do students entering university have the basic writing and math skills they need? 2005. Web. 13 Aug. 2020 <http://en.copian.ca/library/research/ccl/lessons_learning/do_students_have_basic/do_students_have_basic.pdf>
Canadian Council on Learning (CCL) (2005). Do students entering university have the basic writing and math skills they need?. Retrieved August 13, 2020, from http://en.copian.ca/library/research/ccl/lessons_learning/do_students_have_basic/do_students_have_basic.pdf
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