From Better Skills to Better Work: How Career Ladders can Support the Transition from Low-Skill to High-Skill Work (2013)

Becoming State of the Art: Research Brief No.3, 2013

This research paper is the third in a series prepared by Essential Skills Ontario (ESO) to encourage innovation in the delivery of literacy and essential skills.

The paper introduces the concept of “career ladders,” an approach that helps those facing employment barriers, including low education levels, to participate more fully in the labour market.

The career ladders approach, which has been used successfully in other countries, is based on a series of connected literacy, language, and skills training programs that help individuals to find work within specific industries like manufacturing, healthcare, retail and customer service, and others.

Career ladders are also known as “career pathways” or “stackable learning.”

The authors note that adults with the least amount of education are also the least likely to participate in formal and informal education, and those earning low wages get less on-the-job training than their higher earning counterparts. That means those who most need training are least likely to receive it.

The career ladders approach addresses this because it is flexible enough to meet the challenges of those trying to juggle family responsibilities and work by allowing job-seekers and workers to enter or advance within a specific industry sector on a continuous basis.

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Added: 
2013-06-18
APA citation
Essential Skills Ontario. From Better Skills to Better Work: How Career Ladders can Support the Transition from Low-Skill to High-Skill Work 2013. Web. 18 Jan. 2021 <http://en.copian.ca/library/research/eso/better_skills/better_skills.pdf>
Essential Skills Ontario (2013). From Better Skills to Better Work: How Career Ladders can Support the Transition from Low-Skill to High-Skill Work. Retrieved January 18, 2021, from http://en.copian.ca/library/research/eso/better_skills/better_skills.pdf
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