The Longitudinal Return on Investment on Training to Support Innovation in the Workplace (2010)

This document outlines a project undertaken to determine the cumulative return on investment that diverse types of workplace training provide with respect to profitability, labour productivity, probability of innovation, and the intensity of innovation in the workplace.

In addition, the project involved investigating which forms of workplace training are complementary to one another, in order to help organizations maximize their return on training.

The project used data from Statistics Canada’s Workplace and Employee Survey (WES) from 1999 to 2005 in order to get a comprehensive longitudinal dataset of Canadian firms. The longitudinal data allowed the authors to assess the cumulative effect of training, as well as any time lag that might exist in the improvement of productivity.

The analysis used control variables for the size of the organization, the industry in which it operates, and its initial level of innovative activity.

Project findings suggest that each industry displays unique sets of training practice usage. Depending on the industry where a firm operates and the size of the firm, the combination of training practices that should be implemented simultaneously to support innovation differs widely. By implementing the proper fit of training practices, managers can significantly increase the return on training investments for their firm.

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Added: 
2013-07-31
APA citation
Jennifer Percival and Brian Cozzarin. The Longitudinal Return on Investment on Training to Support Innovation in the Workplace 2010. Web. 13 Aug. 2020 <http://en.copian.ca/library/learning/ccl/longitudinal/longitudinal.pdf>
Jennifer Percival & Brian Cozzarin (2010). The Longitudinal Return on Investment on Training to Support Innovation in the Workplace. Retrieved August 13, 2020, from http://en.copian.ca/library/learning/ccl/longitudinal/longitudinal.pdf
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