Literacy Matters: Unlocking the Literacy Potential of Aboriginal Peoples in Canada (2013)

TD Economics Special Report

This report, prepared by the senior economist with TD Bank Group, looks at the poor state of literacy among Aboriginal Canadians and suggests practices to improve the situation.

Slightly more than 60 percent of Aboriginal Canadians do not have the literacy skills necessary to participate fully in the current knowledge-based economy, the author says. Four out of 10 Aboriginal children score poorly in early development tests of language and communication skills.

Aboriginal people face numerous barriers to learning, including geographic isolation; poverty and unsafe living conditions; racism and discrimination; and differing cultural perspectives on the nature of literacy.

The author presents a list of practices designed to promote stronger literacy skills among Canada’s Aboriginal peoples. They include engaging parents to dispel the stigma associated with education; making Aboriginal students feel valued and welcome; incorporating Aboriginal approaches to learning into curriculum and teaching methods; increasing access and targeted funding for literacy programs and supports for those Aboriginal peoples in rural and remote areas; and delivering teacher support and training to ensure that literacy programs are both sustainable and of high quality.

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2013-08-07
APA citation
Sonya Gulati. Literacy Matters: Unlocking the Literacy Potential of Aboriginal Peoples in Canada 2013. Web. 5 Aug. 2020 <http://en.copian.ca/library/research/literacy_matters_special_report/literacy_matters_special_report.pdf>
Sonya Gulati (2013). Literacy Matters: Unlocking the Literacy Potential of Aboriginal Peoples in Canada. Retrieved August 5, 2020, from http://en.copian.ca/library/research/literacy_matters_special_report/literacy_matters_special_report.pdf
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