The educational attainment of Aboriginal peoples in Canada: National Household Survey (NHS) (2013)

NHS in Brief

Published by Statistics Canada, this document offers a look at educational attainment among Aboriginal people, based on data collected in the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS). Roughly 4.5 million households across Canada were selected for the NHS, representing about one-third of all households.

Almost one-half of the Aboriginal people surveyed in 2011 had a postsecondary qualification, compared with almost two-thirds of the non-Aboriginal population aged 25 to 64.

The main difference between the Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations in terms of postsecondary qualifications was with the proportion of university graduates. Among the Aboriginal population, 9.8 percent had a university degree, compared with 26.5 percent of the non-Aboriginal population.

In 2011, younger Aboriginal women and men were both more likely to have college diplomas than older ones.

The term Aboriginal includes First Nations, Métis, and Inuit. The authors also point to differences in educational attainment among those groups, with more than a third of Inuit respondents having a postsecondary qualification, compared with more than half of Métis, and more than four in ten First Nations people.

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2013-09-30
APA citation
Sarah-Jane Ferguson and John Zhao. The educational attainment of Aboriginal peoples in Canada: National Household Survey (NHS) 2013. Web. 5 Jun. 2020 <http://en.copian.ca/library/research/stats/edu_attainment_aboriginal/edu_attainment_aboriginal.pdf>
Sarah-Jane Ferguson & John Zhao (2013). The educational attainment of Aboriginal peoples in Canada: National Household Survey (NHS). Retrieved June 5, 2020, from http://en.copian.ca/library/research/stats/edu_attainment_aboriginal/edu_attainment_aboriginal.pdf
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