Accommodating Learning Styles in Bridging Education Programs for Internationally Educated Professionals (2009)

Despite the development of bridging education programs designed to help them, internationally educated professionals (IEPs) in Canada continue to experience high levels of underemployment and unemployment.

The author of this study uses surveys and interviews to explore the challenges, successes, and barriers that IEP students experience within bridging education programs. Specifically, the research focuses on determining if IEPs bring distinctive learning styles and preferences, developed prior to immigrating to Canada, to the classroom.

The findings suggest that IEPs tend to begin the learning cycle through concrete experience and reflective observation. They are also considered above average in their readiness to be self- rather than teacher-directed learners, a quality suggesting that IEPs are able to perform well in future jobs requiring problem-solving ability and creativity.

The multicultural nature of bridging education poses additional challenges for instructors, who are dealing with learners’ widely diverse professional and personal backgrounds. The educational focus of bridging education needs to accommodate this fact.

The author also suggests that bridging education needs to focus on the development of a Canadian professional identity and cultural competency, rather than simply bridging gaps in distinct skills and areas of knowledge.

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2013-10-08
APA citation
Lillie Lum. Accommodating Learning Styles in Bridging Education Programs for Internationally Educated Professionals 2009. Web. 3 Jul. 2022 <http://en.copian.ca/library/research/ccl/accommodating_learning_styles/accommodating_learning_styles.pdf>
Lillie Lum (2009). Accommodating Learning Styles in Bridging Education Programs for Internationally Educated Professionals. Retrieved July 3, 2022, from http://en.copian.ca/library/research/ccl/accommodating_learning_styles/accommodating_learning_styles.pdf
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