Supporting Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Adult Immigrants as Learners (2013)

This paper is part of Stories from the Field, a research project that investigates the principles and practices that best support both the learning and teaching of literacy.

The author describes a literacy program at Alberta’s Bow Valley College that works with deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) immigrant adults.

She points out that on top of the usual settlement challenges that all immigrants face, these learners must first learn American Sign Language (ASL), then transfer that skill into learning English. Within one literacy program, they are learning two new languages.

From talking with both practitioners and researchers, the author finds many topics that arise in classes of DHH learners, including race, difference, abilities, exclusion, deaf culture, and immigrant cultures.

When deaf educators work with DHH learners exclusively in their own classes, teaching ASL and using it as the language of instruction to teach English, they are engaging in an overtly political act that honours deaf culture and ASL as equal to hearing culture and English.

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2014-03-18
APA citation
Sandra Loschnig. Supporting Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Adult Immigrants as Learners 2013. Web. 26 Feb. 2021 <http://en.copian.ca/library/research/bowvalley/supporting_deaf/supporting_deaf.pdf>
Sandra Loschnig (2013). Supporting Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Adult Immigrants as Learners. Retrieved February 26, 2021, from http://en.copian.ca/library/research/bowvalley/supporting_deaf/supporting_deaf.pdf
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