Can you learn how to learn for life? Components from expert learning research (2009)

Journal of Applied Research on Learning, Vol. 2, Special Issue, Article 4, 2009

The author of this paper reviews research literature on expert learners to identify three components that can promote the goal of lifelong learning.

Expert learners may be accomplished musicians, professional writers, researchers, and leaders in medicine and law, for example. By definition, they have invested a significant amount of time in learning and receiving formal instruction in their respective areas of expertise and, most significantly, continue to pursue learning as part of their everyday activities.

Three common components emerge in studies of expert learners: deliberate practice, motivated by the goal of improving performance; mentorship, whether by teachers, parents, coaches, or others who are highly knowledgeable about a domain; and personal dispositions such as interest, motivation, and perseverance, all of which entail some level of self-regulation. Together, these three components reflect the metaskills required for individuals to learn across the lifespan irrespective of domain.

The author recommends that these components be modeled and measured with cognitive diagnostic assessments at the classroom level, when students are potentially undergoing a sensitive period for learning these life skills.

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2014-03-24
APA citation
Jacqueline P. Leighton. Can you learn how to learn for life? Components from expert learning research 2009. Web. 1 Oct. 2020 <http://en.copian.ca/library/research/jarl/can_you_learn/can_you_learn.pdf>
Jacqueline P. Leighton (2009). Can you learn how to learn for life? Components from expert learning research. Retrieved October 1, 2020, from http://en.copian.ca/library/research/jarl/can_you_learn/can_you_learn.pdf
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