Examining the personal side of change within a collaborative inquiry group: Adopting Problem-Based Learning in primary/elementary science education (2008)

Journal of Applied Research on Learning, Vol. 2, No. 1, Article 3, 2008

This paper describes the experiences of a university researcher and five teachers from a school district in Newfoundland and Labrador as they planned and implemented a Problem-Based Learning (PBL) science curriculum. In PBL, the teacher acts as a facilitator as students, working individually or in small groups, find workable solutions to problems.

Over the course of the 12-month study, the group met for more than 40 hours for planning and, later, for debriefing. All meetings were recorded and transcribed. The teachers’ respective PBL units were implemented in September and October 2006.

All teachers in this study were new adopters of PBL, and were concerned about how they would deal with the new approach, and about the impact it would have on their students. A lack of time to develop and implement PBL experiences was one of the major concerns expressed by all teachers.

Operating within a collaborative inquiry group provided a forum for finding ways to resolve their concerns, and offered the teachers a supportive context for the new experience, the author notes.

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2014-04-14
APA citation
Karen Goodnough. Examining the personal side of change within a collaborative inquiry group: Adopting Problem-Based Learning in primary/elementary science education 2008. Web. 27 Nov. 2020 <http://en.copian.ca/library/research/jarl/examining/examining.pdf>
Karen Goodnough (2008). Examining the personal side of change within a collaborative inquiry group: Adopting Problem-Based Learning in primary/elementary science education. Retrieved November 27, 2020, from http://en.copian.ca/library/research/jarl/examining/examining.pdf
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