Using Simulation to Engage Police in Learning about Mental Illness: The Impact of Realism on the Learning Process (2009)

This document describes a study undertaken to evaluate the impact of using simulation to educate police officers about mental illness and about how to respond effectively to common critical incidents involving mentally ill persons. The study involved focus groups, surveys, and a scale that measures opinions about mental illness.

Four simulations were developed for the study, depicting critical incidents involving suicidal behaviour, delusional thinking, hallucinations, and self-harming behaviour.

The findings of the study suggest that simulations are an effective tool for educating officers about mental illness, with police participants describing the simulations as realistic and easy to use. Several participants suggested that this type of education should be mandatory for all frontline officers and for members of the police leadership.

However, most of the police officers also expressed a need for face-to-face education sessions where ideas can be shared and participants can ask questions. They saw the simulations as providing a good foundation for learning, with a follow-up discussion group or seminar adding to the benefits.

This would suggest that a hybrid teaching methodology would be the most effective, the authors note.

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Added: 
2014-05-12
APA citation
Bill Goodman, Chris Hinton, Wendy Stanyon and Jay Tashiro. Using Simulation to Engage Police in Learning about Mental Illness: The Impact of Realism on the Learning Process 2009. Web. 9 Aug. 2020 <http://en.copian.ca/library/research/ccl/simulation/simulation.pdf>
Bill Goodman, Chris Hinton, Wendy Stanyon & Jay Tashiro (2009). Using Simulation to Engage Police in Learning about Mental Illness: The Impact of Realism on the Learning Process. Retrieved August 9, 2020, from http://en.copian.ca/library/research/ccl/simulation/simulation.pdf
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