Literacy and the Courts (1996)

Protecting the Right to Understand

The majority of people who are charged, act as witnesses, or sit on juries in the criminal justice system may not be able to use written legal documents or materials effectively. Others may have limited information about legal procedures and terminology, making understanding the context and meaning of legal materials difficult.
The purposes of this publication are to help those who work in the criminal justice system to improve their understanding of the needs of justice system users, particularly those with limited literacy skills; and to improve the effectiveness of justice system communications with users.

The purpose of this publication is to assist lawyers, judges, police, court staff and others working in the criminal justice system : to improve their awareness and understanding of the needs of justice system users, particularly those with limited literacy skills; to improve the effectiveness of justice system communications with users.

This booklet explains how literacy awareness and links with literacy organizations can help criminal justice system officials : to save time and money; to avoid unnecessary public and media criticism; to reduce miscarriages of justice; and to strengthen public and client confidence in the criminal justice system.

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Added: 
1996-01-01
APA citation
Linda MacLeod and Suzan McDougall-Gagnon-Gingras. Literacy and the Courts 1996. Web. 5 Dec. 2020 <http://en.copian.ca/library/research/litcou/litcou.pdf>
Linda MacLeod & Suzan McDougall-Gagnon-Gingras (1996). Literacy and the Courts. Retrieved December 5, 2020, from http://en.copian.ca/library/research/litcou/litcou.pdf
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