Changing Literacy Programs to Take Account of Violence – Brief Notes (2002)

This paper looks at how addressing the impact of violence on learning offers the opportunity to create nurturing education systems that help both learners and practitioners.

The aftermath of violence is often spoken of in medical terms, focusing on identifying who has a problem, and referring them for help, the author says. The implication is that “normal” students can cope with the education system, and those who cannot cope have something wrong with them. In this view, those students need to change, but the education system can remain the same.

Western educational systems do not often focus on the whole person. Those who have experienced violence already feel fragmented, and this further isolation may be particularly painful. Literacy practitioners who have made efforts to draw the whole self into the learning process have had to work outside ingrained concepts of “proper teaching” and “acceptable outcomes.”

A key question now is whether the literacy movement will be able to build on support for diverse possibilities in teaching in ways that recognize the widespread nature of violence and its impact on learning.

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2005-10-26
APA citation
Jenny Horsman. Changing Literacy Programs to Take Account of Violence – Brief Notes 2002. Web. 1 Oct. 2020 <http://en.copian.ca/library/research/horsman/brief/brief.pdf>
Jenny Horsman (2002). Changing Literacy Programs to Take Account of Violence – Brief Notes. Retrieved October 1, 2020, from http://en.copian.ca/library/research/horsman/brief/brief.pdf
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