Adults Living with Limited Literacy and Chronic Illness: Patient Education Experiences (2010)

Adult Basic Education and Literacy Journal, 4(1),24-33

This study investigates how Canadians with limited literacy skills make sense of their patient-education experiences. The authors cite a Canadian Council on Learning (CCL) study indicating that 60 per cent of Canadians don’t have sufficient skills to manage their health and their health-care needs. That can mean difficulty in taking medications correctly or using health services effectively.

The authors note that research on the link between literacy and health has tended to focus on policy issues, program evaluation, and assessment tools. Patient education studies have centered on improving the readability of materials and increasing the awareness of literacy issues among health-care professionals. The authors instead sought to investigate the meaning of patient education experiences for adults with limited literacy and chronic illness and to ask how these patient experiences affected these adults and what types of barriers they encountered.

The authors divide their findings into five themes: roles and relationships; language and health-care interactions; living between worlds; mismatched expectations; and powerlessness. They also evaluate their findings through the lenses of adult learning theories and discuss the implications of their findings for all parties.

The authors provide a literature review and outline their research methodology.

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Added: 
2010-04-14
APA citation
Maurice C. Taylor and Judy King. Adults Living with Limited Literacy and Chronic Illness: Patient Education Experiences 2010. Web. 5 Oct. 2022 <http://en.copian.ca/library/research/mtaylor/patient/patient.pdf>
Maurice C. Taylor & Judy King (2010). Adults Living with Limited Literacy and Chronic Illness: Patient Education Experiences. Retrieved October 5, 2022, from http://en.copian.ca/library/research/mtaylor/patient/patient.pdf
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