Nonparticipation in Literacy and Upgrading Programs: A National Study (2002)

The author of this document points out that 22 per cent of Canadian adults have seriously compromised literacy skills and a further 26 per cent can cope with written material only when it is presented in clear, simple terms. Yet just five to 10 per cent of potential learners enrol in programs to improve reading, writing or math skills.

This document presents the findings of a Canada-wide study that asks why those adult potential learners are not participating in literacy or upgrading programs.

The findings are presented in two self-contained reports. The first presents qualitative data gathered from in-person interviews with 44 people across Canada. The second report, the quantitative data, is based on a large-scale phone survey with a representative sample of 866 people who had not taken any literacy or upgrading programs since leaving school without a diploma.

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2011-01-18
APA citation
Ellen Long. Nonparticipation in Literacy and Upgrading Programs: A National Study 2002. Web. 29 May. 2020 <http://en.copian.ca/library/research/abc/programs/programs.pdf>
Ellen Long (2002). Nonparticipation in Literacy and Upgrading Programs: A National Study. Retrieved May 29, 2020, from http://en.copian.ca/library/research/abc/programs/programs.pdf
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