Understanding Aboriginal Literacy Markets in Canada: A segmentation analysis (2011)

This report explores the role that literacy plays in Canada’s labour markets, with a specific focus on how literacy influences the success of the country’s Aboriginal populations.

Using the results of the 2006 census, the authors compare the demand for literacy skills, as implied by the distribution of employment by occupation, to the available supply of literacy skills. They use those comparisons to identify skill shortages and surpluses for each of Canada’s Aboriginal populations.

The report includes estimates of how much it would cost to eliminate literacy skills shortages through instruction and the potential return on such investments in terms of higher labour incomes.

The authors conclude that the Canadian economy appears to be relatively inefficient because it does not make full use of the available supply of literacy skills. The economy uses only 63 per cent of the aggregate supply available in the Aboriginal population. Finding ways to increase the aggregate demand for labour would yield significant increases in Aboriginal earnings and output.

The authors use many charts and graphs to make the information easier to understand.

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2011-12-06
APA citation
T. Scott Murray and Richard Shillington. Understanding Aboriginal Literacy Markets in Canada: A segmentation analysis 2011. Web. 1 Oct. 2020 <http://en.copian.ca/library/research/tsmurray/aboriginal_oles/aboriginal_oles.pdf>
T. Scott Murray & Richard Shillington (2011). Understanding Aboriginal Literacy Markets in Canada: A segmentation analysis. Retrieved October 1, 2020, from http://en.copian.ca/library/research/tsmurray/aboriginal_oles/aboriginal_oles.pdf
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