A Study of Aboriginal Teachers' Professional Knowledge and Experience in Canadian Schools (2010)

This qualitative study was carried out by the Canadian Teachers’ Federation to determine what insights can be gained from the experiences of Aboriginal teachers in public schools and to find ways of using that knowledge to support Aboriginal education in those schools.

Participants completed questionnaires and took part in focus groups that examined the philosophy of teaching; the integration of Aboriginal content and perspectives into the curriculum; racism in education; and allies of Aboriginal education.

Findings from the study showed that Aboriginal teachers chose the profession because they valued the opportunity to teach Aboriginal culture and history; to foster responsible citizens; to challenge negative stereotypes; and to serve as role models.

Racism was experienced in the form of a disregard for their qualifications and capabilities, and for Aboriginal content and perspectives; a lowering of expectations of Aboriginal students; and a discounting of the effects of colonization and oppression on Aboriginal people.

The teachers defined allies of Aboriginal education broadly, including themselves, their families and their communities in the definition, along with non-Aboriginal colleagues who remained positive and open-minded.

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2011-12-22
APA citation
Verna St. Denis. A Study of Aboriginal Teachers' Professional Knowledge and Experience in Canadian Schools 2010. Web. 26 Nov. 2020 <http://en.copian.ca/library/research/ccl/study_aboriginal_teachers/study_aboriginal_teachers.pdf>
Verna St. Denis (2010). A Study of Aboriginal Teachers' Professional Knowledge and Experience in Canadian Schools. Retrieved November 26, 2020, from http://en.copian.ca/library/research/ccl/study_aboriginal_teachers/study_aboriginal_teachers.pdf
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