Children's learning activities

Family Tutoring (2009)

Families Learning to Read and Write Together

Family Tutoring is a family literacy program developed by the NWT Literacy Council to support school-aged children and their families in their efforts to develop reading and writing skills. The program is geared for parents, teacher’s assistants, and tutors who work with children at the emerging and early reader stages.

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Added: 
2010-01-08

How To Kit - 20 Fantastic Outdoor Family Literacy Activities (2009)

This How To Kit was developed to help organizations celebrate literacy in the Northwest Territories. It provides examples of winter activities that can be used to promote family literacy. Some of the activities include winter treasure hunts, cooking, science experiments in the snow, sliding and book parties as well as skating games.

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Added: 
2009-12-30

Pass the Play, Please: Literacy & Learning Through Fun & Games (2007)

a Great-West Life Connecting Communities guide

There are a million ways to encourage kids to get involved in language, literacy and learning. Many of the day to day things that we do with our children have a huge impact on their development.

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Added: 
2009-10-28

How To Kit - Puppets (2009)

The How-to Puppet Kit was created to help celebrate NWT Literacy Week. Puppets lend themselves very well to family literacy activities. Even very young children can make their own puppets and use them to make up and act out stories.

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Added: 
2009-09-04

Speech and language milestone chart (2009)

Fact Sheet

For most children, all the skills needed for oral language are acquired naturally by the time they are five years old. The fact sheet/speech and language milestone chart offers insight into where a child should be at a particular age ranging from one to six years. It also offers activities one could use in order to encourage language acquisition and proper speech patterns.

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Added: 
2009-09-02

Library preschool storytimes: Developing early literacy skills in children (2008)

Public libraries have traditionally offered early literacy programming to preschool children in the form of story times. Do public library story times prepare children to be ready to learn when they enter school? Is there scientific research to support these intuitive beliefs? Are public libraries really setting the stage for future successes in learning?

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Added: 
2009-06-24

Family Math Groups (2009)

An Exploration of Content and Style

In this literature review, the author outlines the relationship of family math and family literacy, explores the importance of play in developing early skills, and traces the mathematical development of early childhood. She reviews several large and small scale family math programs, and discusses common findings as to what makes these programs successful.

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Added: 
2009-04-28

Let's sing together (2008)

This booklet is a collection of songs and rhymes that parents and children can enjoy together. By singing, dancing and playing with their child, parents help develop their child's language and help better prepare him or her for school.

When parents and children sing together, the child learns to listen; to wait for his or her turn; to imitate gestures, sounds and words; and learns new words and actions.

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Added: 
2009-02-04

Playing With Words (2007)

Any Child Can

Early involvement with words and reading is essential for the development of all aspects of a child’s life. This book provides many practical ideas on how to make this fun with everyday activities. The author shows parents how to take advantage of teaching and learning opportunities that occur while preparing meals, during a trip to the grocery store or an outing to the park, and other times during the day.

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Added: 
2008-05-09

Literacy Development from Birth to Age Three (2012)

Based on the Nipissing Developmental Screen

Parents and other family members play a key role in a child's early development; they are their children’s first, and most important, teachers. The foundation for literacy development begins when children are very young, long before they go to school.

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Added: 
2008-03-25

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