Dropout rates

Student achievement: What should we really be measuring? (2005)

Lessons in Learning – October 13, 2005

The question of how much and how well children are learning in school is a concern for parents, students, employers, and the general public. The authors of this article look at three critical measures of success: student achievement in the core areas of language, mathematics and science; the disparity of student achievement among different socioeconomic groups; and high-school dropout rates.

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2013-05-23

Good news: Canada's high-school dropout rates are falling (2006)

Lessons in Learning – December 16, 2005

While much progress has been made across Canada in reducing the high-school dropout rate, the progress is much slower among certain groups, including Aboriginal students, those in rural areas, and young men. The authors of this article examine what is known about factors affecting high-school completion, and look at ways to encourage all students to complete high school.

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2013-05-08

The rural-urban gap in education (2006)

Lessons in Learning - March 1, 2006

The authors note that students in rural Canada are falling being their urban counterparts, both in test scores and in level of education attained. Evidence suggests that school conditions and economic conditions combine to discourage rural students from achieving their educational potential.

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2011-05-27

Fact Sheet - Learning to know: High-School Dropout Rate (2010)

The authors of this document begin by defining the dropout rate as the proportion of Canadians aged 20 to 24 who have not completed high school and are not attending school.

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2011-03-18

Lost Contacts: How to Prevent Them (2006)

This project looked at the issue of losing contact with learners and adopted the following three objectives as a result:

To analyze the data relating to lost contacts within the four Ontario literacy streams (Anglophone, Native, Francophone and Deaf).

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2007-05-18

Building the Right Partnerships (2004)

Peter Calamai addressed the Second Canadian Conference on Literacy and Health on October 19, 2004 in Ottawa. In his address, he discussed adult literacy, including literacy levels Canada, literacy and health relationships and the importance of forging partnerships between the public health field and the literacy movement.

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2004-11-26

The Reluctant Learner (1990)

Research Report on Nonparticipation and Dropout in Literacy Programs in British Columbia

The aim of this project was to explore the reasons why individuals in British Columbia chose not to participate in Adult Basic Education Literacy programs, or why they dropped out. This report reviews the literature on related topics; outlines the procedures followed by the writer to obtain some answers to the problems in the British Columbian context; presents the findings; and discusses the results.

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2002-08-01

Encouraging Adults to Acquire Literacy Skills (1990)

This resource includes the following:
- Information on who are the low-literate adults?
- What is literacy and why is it important in our society?
- Why do low-literate adults not participate in programs?
- What participants say about coming to adult basic literacy programs?
- And what about dropouts?
- Learner recruitment and retention
- Useful resources

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2002-07-29

The Big Picture Up Close (2002)

Outcomes of a Province-Wide Consultation

This document outlines a province-wide consultation process that took place throughout British Columbia from September, 2000 to August, 2001. It is a comprehensive sense of what British Columbians thought and believed about “literacy and lifelong learning”.

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2002-07-11

Research Into Providing Literacy/Upgrading Programs For Youth Who Have Dropped Out Of School (1999)

This is a special project of Frontier College. Strong literacy skills are a predictor of success in school and in the workplace. Many Canadian youth (aged 16-24) who have dropped out of school have low literacy skills. Even if they wish to return to school, they have to overcome a number of barriers which contribute to their low-literacy skills in the first place.

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1999-01-01

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