1991

Let Women Speak Their Diversity! An Interview with Charlotte Bunch (1991)

Women's Education des femmes, Winter 1991 - Vol. 8, No. 3/4

This article contains an interview with Charlotte Bunch, U.S. feminist activist and author. At time the article was written, she was employed as the Director of the Center for Global Issues and Women's Leadership at Douglass College, Rutgers University, New Jersey.

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2004-08-31

A Ms. Infinity Conference: Notes North of 60 (1991)

Women's Education des femmes, Summer 1991 - Vol. 9, No. 1

This article is about the second Ms. Infinity conference, in Whitehorse, Yukon. Over 120 women were involved, with a full third of students coming to Whitehorse from rural communities.

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2004-08-27

Mr. Brown's Math Class and Other Stories of Exclusion (1991)

Women's Education des femmes, Summer 1991 - Vol. 9, No. 1

The answer to the question of whether equal access to education translates into equal outcomes for girls and boys—for women and men—is not a forgone conclusion. It seems that while for most men education fulfills their aspirations, for the women sitting next to them—completing the same assignments, listening to the same lectures, reading the same materials—hopes and aspirations vaporize in the face of social reality.

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2004-08-27

Here Today, Where Tomorrow? (1991)

Women's Education des femmes, Summer 1991 - Vol. 9, No. 1

This article is about an annual program for young women, initiated in 1985. It was conceived and developed in response to the voices of women enrolled in college level career change programs. These women described a lifetime lack of practical learning experiences and work opportunities that provided both satisfaction and financial independence.

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2004-08-27

Transforming Mathematics Pedagogy (1991)

Women's Education des femmes, Fall 1991 - Vol. 9, No. 2

In this article, the author, a professor of mathematics in a postsecondary institution, tells the story of her efforts to change her teaching style in order to avoid discriminating against students who are currently denied access to mathematics. She succeeded in providing a more meaningful and equal mathematics education for all students.

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2004-08-27

In Their Own Words: Stories by Women Engineers about Themselves (1991)

Women's Education des femmes, Fall 1991 - Vol. 9, No. 2

In this article, the author discusses women in engineering, a minority in a male-dominated profession.

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2004-08-24

"I Would Emphasize the Joy of Science": An Interview with Ursula Franklin (1991)

Women's Education des femmes, Summer 1991 - Vol. 9, No. 1

This interview is conducted by Jan Clarke, guest editor of this issue of Women's Education des femmes. She interviewed Ursula Franklin, who is well known for her interest in the social impact of technology.

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2004-08-17

Go For It (1991)

Women's Education des femmes, Summer 1991 - Vol. 9, No. 1

When this article was written, the author was a grade thirteen student in Ontario. She describes her positive experiences with science fairs in school, and her passion for science.

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2004-08-13

Jane Deer in Science: A Sample Case (1991)

Women's Education des femmes, Fall 1991 - Vol. 9, No. 2

When the author was a student in the Honours Science program at the University of Toronto in the 1950s, there was little expectation that she or the four women in her program would ever become professional scientists. Today, the author states that girls have a far better chance of becoming scientists and engineers if that is their ambition. There are, however, obstacles.

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2004-07-29

Foreigners to the Culture: Women in Trades and Technologies (1991)

Women's Education des femmes, Fall 1991- Vol. 9, No. 2

In 1983, women made up about three percent of the apprenticeable trades and slightly more of the technologies. This number had barely increased from ten years before. It seems, that although there is an increase in the number of women entering the trades and technologies, many are not staying. The reason is not that they don't like the work, but because they can't stand the environment.

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2004-07-28

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