1995

Post-Secondary Funding: Student Loan Bankruptcy (1995)

Women's Education des femmes, Fall 1995 - Vol. 11, No. 4

For women in the 1990s, post secondary education became a lottery dream as the financial expenditures of such an investment only promised serious financial indebtedness. The Canadian federal and provincial governments reduced and eliminated various student grants, effectively increasing individual student loan debt loads.

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2004-09-09

"So you think I should be shot?" Unteaching Homophobia (1995)

Women's Education des femmes, Spring 1995 - Vol. 11, No. 3

In this article, the author discusses the necessity of teaching students the value of diversity. Differences of gender, skin color, class, ability, age or sexual orientation should be valued for the richness they bring to our lives, not used as excuses to value some lives over others.

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2004-09-02

Not Just Pen and Paper: Women's Access to Literacy (1995)

Women's Education des femmes, Spring 1995 - Vol. 11, No. 3

The author examines why it is that after years of trying to improve women's literacy skills globally, they continue to be low and, in fact, are declining rather than showing signs of improvement.

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2004-09-02

Learning/Teaching Feminist Counselling (1995)

Women's Education des femmes, Spring 1995 - Vol. 11, No. 3

This article is about the Counselling Women Certificate Program (C.W.C.P.), offered, at the time the article was written, by the Women's Program through the Faculty of Extension at the University of Alberta. The course was designed for women who work with women in counseling settings and who are interested in a feminist perspective.

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2004-08-31

Learning to Tell My Own Stories (1995)

Women's Education des femmes, Fall 1995 - Vol. 11, No. 4

Pamela Simmons graduated in 1995 from the University of Western Ontario, and then planned to pursue a career as a freelance writer. In this article, she shares her thoughts and experiences on achieving her degree.

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2004-08-31

Women and Substance Abuse in New Brunswick: Educational Priorities (1995)

Women's Education des femmes, Spring 1995 - Vol. 11, No. 3

Women represent only 16 percent of consumers of services and programs in the area of alcoholism and drug dependency in New Brunswick, but when this article was written, one third of all alcoholic or drug-dependent New Brunswickers were women.

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2004-08-27

Violence: A Barrier to Our Education (1995)

Women's Education des femmes, Fall 1995 - Vol. 11, No. 4

In this article, the authors share ideas about the effects of violence on education.

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2004-08-27

Speaking Against Patriarchy: Women in the Catholic School System (1995)

Women's Education des femmes, Fall 1995 - Vol. 11, No. 4

In a previous article entitled "Criticizing the Pope: A Catholic Teacher's Experience" (Wedf, Fall 1994), the author outlined the successful arbitration case she fought against the Metropolitan Separate School Board in Toronto over her removal in 1992 as a teacher of religion. For several years, she had been an outspoken critic of the hierarchy of the Catholic Church, specifically on issues related to women and sexual abuse.

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2004-08-26

Womanhood, Deviance and Reform: Women's Rehabilation in Prison (1995)

Women's Education des femmes, Fall 1995 - Vol. 11, No. 4

In this article, the author discusses programs for women in prison, designed to rehabilitate women to acceptable states of womanhood and while the roles of wife, mother and homemaker are reinforced, women's diverse problems and needs are overlooked. There is discussion of the relationship between crime committed by women and their economic need due to unemployment, underemployment, poor job skills and a lack of education.

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2004-08-23

Help! (Not-so-good Materials for Learning to Read) (1995)

Women's Education des femmes, Spring 1995 - Vol. 11, No. 3

In this article, the author, in her role as a tutor for an adult literacy student, relates her experience dealing with inappropriate primary adult reading material. She discusses the sexist views and gender stereotyping found throughout the four books she was asked to use to teach a retired tradesman to read.

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2004-07-29

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