Lessons in Learning

How low literacy can affect your health (2008)

Lessons in Learning – March 6, 2008

If individuals are to make educated decisions about their health, they must have the literacy skills required to find and understand reliable and up-to-date health-related information, the authors of this document say. However, despite Canada’s pride in its national health care program and a relatively high standard of living, disparities in literacy skills have a significant negative impact on the health of Canadians.

Get resource
Added: 
2012-08-24

Bullying in Canada - how intimidation affects learning (2008)

Lessons in Learning – March 20, 2008

Bullying in schools can cause serious and lasting harm to both the victim and the perpetrator, and has been linked to such problems as substance abuse, aggression, and social withdrawal.

The authors of this document examine research about the effectiveness of intervention programs in ending bullying.

Get resource
Added: 
2012-08-16

Aboriginal and rural under-representation in Canada's medical schools (2008)

Lessons in Learning – April 17, 2008

Aboriginal people represent 4.5 percent of the Canadian population, but less than one percent of first-year medical students in Canada surveyed for a 2001 study were Aboriginal people. The same study showed that while almost a quarter of Canadians live in rural areas, only about 11 percent of medical students were from such communities.

Get resource
Added: 
2012-08-10

Students on the move: Ways to address the impact of mobility among Aboriginal students (2008)

Lessons in Learning – May 15, 2008

The high school completion rate for Aboriginal students falls well short of the Canadian average. Recent research has highlighted student mobility as a major barrier to successful completion of high school.

Get resource
Added: 
2012-07-30

Mixed Messages: How to choose among conflicting information to support healthy development in young children (2008)

Lessons in Learning – May 29, 2008

Today’s parents are faced with a bewildering amount of information on how to promote the health of their young children. Often, the messages they receive are contradictory, the authors of this paper point out. For instance, messages about safety may conflict with advice on promoting vigorous outdoor activity.

Get resource
Added: 
2012-07-27

Ready to Learn? A look at school readiness in young children (2008)

Lessons in Learning – September 18, 2008

Parents, teachers, and decision-makers all have a stake in ensuring that children are well-prepared when they begin their formal education. However, the authors of this document note that the meaning of the term “ready to learn” is not as clear as it might first appear.

Get resource
Added: 
2012-06-20

Understanding the academic trajectories of ESL students (2008)

Lessons in Learning – October 2, 2008

In this document, the authors explore the implications of research that shows wide variations in learning outcomes among sub-groups of English as a Second Language (ESL) students in schools in Canada’s largest cities.

Get resource
Added: 
2012-06-13

Parlez-vous français? The advantages of bilingualism in Canada (2008)

Lessons in Learning – October 16, 2008

Research has shown that being bilingual confers many cognitive benefits, including diminishing the effects of aging on the brain. In Canada, being able to function in both English and French can also have economic benefits.

Get resource
Added: 
2012-06-07

The replacements – Non-permanent teachers (2008)

Lessons in Learning – November 13, 2008

Non-permanent teachers are known by a variety of titles, including substitute teachers, supply teachers, occasional teachers, or teachers on call. Whatever title they are given, they play an important role in Canada’s education systems: between Kindergarten and Grade 12, a child will be taught by a non-permanent teacher the equivalent of one full year.

Get resource
Added: 
2012-05-31

More education, less employment: Immigrants and the labour market (2008)

Lessons in Learning – October 30, 2008

The authors point out that while recent immigrants to Canada have attained high levels of education, they earn less and are more likely to be unemployed than their Canadian-born counterparts.

Get resource
Added: 
2012-05-11

Pages

© 2020 Copian Library